Steramine Multi-Purpose Sanitizer

Rating:
100% of 100
Loading...
As low as $8.95
In Stock
SKU
Steramine
Sanitize your rebreather loop with Steramine. Steramine sanitizing solutions are non-irritating to the hands, non-corrosive to metals, non-staining, odorless and remain effective all day. Steramine contains a surfactant and will clean and sanitize your rebreather loop in one step.

Steramine is effective against a wide range of pathogens including HIV-1 and CA-MRSA. Steramine contains a quaternary ammonium compound (Myristalkonium Chloride) that is widely used in the food service industry to sanitize food contact surfaces. Steramine has a long history of safe and effective use that meets the public health and regulatory criteria of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

We offer a container of 150 tablets making a total of { 75 to 150 gal | 284 to 568 L } of sanitizer depending on the desired concentration of 200 ppm for soaking or 400 ppm for spraying. Steramine is also available in a ten count box of single use 0.75 fluid ounce packets that can instantly make a total of {15 to 30 gal | 56 to 113 L} of sanitizing solution.

Directions: Use ordinary drinking water to prepare your sanitizing solution. Mix one tablet (for 200 ppm) or two tablets (for 400 ppm) with one gallon of water (Steramine tablets can be slow to dissolve in cold water, so if you need to accelerate the process then dissolve the tablets in a cup of hot tap water and then pour that into the rest of the cold water.) -OR- mix entire contents of one liquid packet with one and half gallons of water (for stronger 400 ppm) or three gallons of water (for 200 ppm). Dive Gear Express recommends the stronger 400 ppm concentration if you are spraying and the 200 ppm concentration if you are soaking. Follow the recommendations from the rebreather manufacturer for cleaning your rebreather, allowing the solution to contact surfaces to be sanitized for at least 30 seconds. Steramine leaves no residue, but we recommend rinsing after use. You should not soak rebreather components (particularly delicate mushroom valves) in hot water and we do not recommend prolonged (i.e. multi-hour) soaking.

More Information
SKU Steramine
Brand DGX
Weight (lbs) 0.7500
Customer Reviews
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
  1. Great service

    By

    on

    Great service
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Thank you for your feedback! You already voted Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
  2. perfect

    By

    on

    perfect
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Thank you for your feedback! You already voted Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Post a comment as
Only registered users can write comments. Please, Sign in or create an account
Only registered users can write reviews. Please, Sign in or create an account

Sanitizers, Disinfectants, Antiseptics and Your Rebreather

Over the years, rebreather divers have used many products as breathing loop cleaners, often with questionable safety, uncertain efficacy, and poor material compatibility. Some products recommended by rebreather manufacturers outside the US, such as Gigasept and Chemgene, are not available in the US because they do not meet the regulatory criteria of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Dive Gear Express has sold two different types of chemicals, each recommended by one or more rebreather manufacturers for cleaning their equipment: RelyOn®, a disinfectant, and Steramine™, a sanitizer. RelyOn (sold outside the US under the name Virkon) and Steramine are both suitable for use in the food service industry where they are proven safe and effective. (The assumption being if they are safe and effective under conditions of repeated exposure to food service workers, are not harmful to equipment, and incidental amounts that get in the food are benign then they should be suitable for cleaning rebreather loops.) The actual difference between the terms disinfectant and sanitizer is largely a matter of legal definitions based on which govenment agency is regulating what industry.

  • A disinfectant is a chemical that completely destroys all specific test organisms on non-living surfaces within 10 minutes under conditions of the AOAC Use Dilution Test. The health care industry is most interested in disinfectants. A dilute solution of sodium hypochlorite (aka 'liquid bleach') is widely used as a disinfectant in health care and common household applications. However, NEVER use bleach to disinfect breathing loops as bleach is not compatible with silicone rubber materials commonly used in rebreathers.

  • A sanitizer is a chemical that reduces the number of microorganisms on non-living surfaces to a safe level. Sanitizers are required to kill 99.999 percent of the specific test organisms present within 30 seconds under conditions of the Weber & Black Test. The food service industry is most interested in sanitizers, particularly because they are fast acting.

  • An antiseptic is applied to living skin or tissue to prevent infection. Antiseptics are not suitable for cleaning rebreathers because in this application they are known to be ineffective and to have material compatibility concerns. There are also concerns about safety in a breathing loop. Just say NO to cleaning your loop with stuff like alcohol-containing mouthwash (Listerine®), povidine iodine (Betadine®), or chlorhexidine (Hibiclens®).

There is one other major difference... the cost. The effective cost per cleaning with Steramine is about a tenth that of RelyOn and most other products.



Conditions of Use    Privacy Notice   

© Copyright 2009 to 2018 Dive Gear Express®
beacon chat logo